Senator Galgiani Announces New Legislation to Fund State Share of Mandated 200 Year Flood Control Assistance for San Joaquin County

April 24, 2017

       Senator Galgiani Announces New Legislation to Fund State Share of Mandated 200 Year Flood Control Assistance for San Joaquin County

SACRAMENTO- Today, Senator Cathleen Galgiani announced legislation that requests funding from the State for flood control assistance for San Joaquin County. Senate Bill (SB) 474, as amended, appropriates $110 million from Proposition 1E, the Disaster Preparedness and Flood Prevention Bond Act of 2006, in order for the State’s local government partners in Reclamation District (RD) 17 to meet state mandated 200 year flood protection standards as required in Senate Bill 5 (2006).

State and local agencies operate and maintain Sacramento and San Joaquin flood control projects, which were constructed mostly by the Federal Government. Assembly Bill 140, (2006) which placed Proposition 1E on the ballot, provided $3 billion dollars for “facilities in the State Plan of Flood Control (i.e., Central Valley), and in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta.”

RD17 is responsible for managing and maintaining the Federal Project Levees, fresh water channels, sloughs, canals, pumps, and other flood protection structures along French Camp Slough and the San Joaquin River in San Joaquin County. The levees and weirs within RD 17 qualify as eligible for systemwide improvements for disaster preparedness and flood prevention projects under Prop 1E because they meet statutory requirements as “facilities of the State Plan of Flood Control."

As a former staff member to then Senator Patrick Johnston, Galgiani helped San Joaquin County constituents deal with the aftermath of the damaging floods which hit the area in 1997.

“More than 40 inches of rain fell within a five day period in the Sierra Nevada watershed, flooding thirty-two square miles of land in south San Joaquin County, “ said Galgiani. “Flood waters put pressure on a Southern Pacific Transportation Company line that cut through Stewart Tract, causing it to buckle. Flood waters carried everything from gas tanks full of propane, to containers of windshield washer fluid, leaving toxic materials and hazardous waste behind as waters subsided.”

“Without a commitment from the state for its share of funds from Prop 1E,” Galgiani said, “constituents and businesses within San Joaquin County, as well as state and federal assets (Interstate 5, Sharpe Army Depot, and Duel Vocational Institution to name a few) will be vulnerable to another devastating flood.”

Senate Bill 474 will be heard in the Senate Committee on Natural Resources and Water, next Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at 9:30 AM in Capitol Room 112. 

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